Posted On: July 10, 2013

Cheerleading Injuries are a Common Cause of Injuries to Minors in Miami and Across Florida

According to the experts at the Institute for Sports Medicine at the Ann & Robert Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, a number of serious injuries have resulted from cheerleading across the country in the past few years, as cheerleading has become more competitive. According to the same source, cheerleading causes 60-70% of all catastrophic injuries in high school girls’ sports. The concern is that the number of girls taking part in this sport is increasing and routines are becoming increasingly acrobatic, which could mean even more injury risk in the near future.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and other organizations have suggested that more needs to be done to promote safety within the sport. Currently, falls are one of the leading causes of injuries in the sport. These often cause head injuries in Miami and other communities, as well as fractures, strains, back injuries, and neck injuries.

Head and spinal cord injuries in Miami and other communities are especially a concern for the Florida cheerleading community, as these can potentially result in permanent injury. For these and other reasons, the AAP has argued that cheerleading should be classified as a sport, to ensure that it gets treated with the same concern as other contact sports that require additional safety precautions.

According to safety experts, if cheerleading were classified as a sport across the country, participants would be protected by additional regulations and would have access to more athletic and health resources. For example, participants would be able to access trained medical staff, certified coaches, and certified facilities. The would also be required to take part in conditioning and strengthening programs, which some experts say could help prevent some injuries.

According to the AAP, many cheerleading-related injuries to children and minors in Miami and other communities could be prevented if tumbling were permitted only on padded or soft surfaces and if excessively high human pyramids were banned.

A big part of the problem, experts say, is that many view cheerleading as a fun activity rather than a serious sport. This attitude means that some parents and schools do not realize the very serious injury potential that is possible with cheerleading.

If your child is currently part of a cheerleading program, make sure that your child works with coaches and staff who are concerned about safety. Encourage your child to take part in strength training and conditioning as well as practice, to build up muscles and skills that can help prevent an accident. Speak to the program organizers and other parents about safety measures being taken to keep the athletes safe.

If your child has been injured through a school sport or through what you believe to be negligence, contact the Flaxman Law Group for a free consultation to review your options with a personal injury attorney. The Flaxman Law Group legal team has already recovered more than $25 on behalf of South Florida families over the past 25 years. Contact the compassionate legal team today to review what can be done in your case.