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What Can be Done to Prevent Medical and Pharmaceutical Negligence

Medication is meant to make patients better, but unfortunately medical malpractice in Miami and other Florida cities as well as medication error can conspire to cause accidental overdoses, dangerous drug interactions, and allergic reactions. In some cases, drug manufacturers are to blame for releasing dangerous drugs to Miami and Florida patients. In many cases, medication problems are preventable and could be prevented if we could:

1) Ensure better information distribution.

Many patients are overwhelmed with information. They may not be given much information about a new medication from a doctor but may be given pages of technical drug information from the pharmacy. Some of the information may be difficult to understand and some may be contradictory. Some information is issued by drug manufacturers and some by pharmacies, which means it may contradict itself or be written in technical language that is difficult to understand.

2) Create better communication between patients, doctors, and pharmacies.

Sometimes, pharmacy negligence cases in Miami and other Florida communities occur because there is a breakdown in communication. Doctors may misinterpret information that patients give them, resulting in misdiagnosis and other issues. In some Miami area hospitals and clinics, patient care is in the hands of many medical experts and there may be miscommunication between individuals or even incorrect information entered into a patient’s chart. Sometimes, the pharmacy cannot read a doctor’s prescription or a doctor enters incorrect information into a prescription. Clearer and more transparent communication between all parties could reduce instances of medication error and misdiagnosis.

medication mistakes

Medication Safety is Everyone’s Responsibility

3) Create reasonable hours and expectations for doctors and pharmacies.

According to some industry experts, the growth of so-called big box pharmacies has created some new dangers. Larger pharmacies fill a much larger number of prescriptions, which puts more pressure on staff to handle many requests. This increases the chance for errors and negligence. Some larger pharmacies also hire more pharmacy technicians and fewer pharmacists (who command higher salaries). Doctors, too, may feel pressured to take on more patients, and this can conspire to create a greater risk of errors and problems.

4) Standardize patient information.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has already been trying to tackle this by developing Patient Medication Information (PMI), which are single-page documents that give patients the information they need to know about their medication in an easy-to-read format. However, more needs to be done to ensure that this is a standard that all patients enjoy.

5) Ensure that information is accessible in different formats.

In some cases, literacy and language issues can prevent patients from understanding the information they are given about a medication. This is especially the case if someone else is picking up medication for a family member or friend, meaning that patient is getting their information third-hand. Making audio and written instructions available online, over the phone, and in written text could be useful for patients.

Have you had a negative medical response after visiting a health care professional or using a medication or medical device? Contact Flaxman Law Group to get legal advice in a free consultation. You could qualify for compensation that could help you pay for your injuries.